The Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce had a ribbon-cutting for Legacy Family Health Care on Saturday at 308 S. Scott St., Warsaw, and owned by Lindsay Kreps and Kyle McDaniel. Pictured (L to R) are Chamber Member Relations Manager Scott Wiley; Kreps' daughters, Katie Riddle, Emily Gray, Janet Kreps and Donna Jo Kreps; Kreps' husband, Fred Kreps, holding their grandson Dakota Gray; Kreps; McDaniel; McDaniel's fiance, Korby Sommers, and his parents, Sue Sommers and Joe Sommers; Chamber Ambassador Scott Clay and Chamber President and CEO Rob Parker. Photo by Leah Sander, InkFree News.
The Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce had a ribbon-cutting for Legacy Family Health Care on Saturday at 308 S. Scott St., Warsaw, and owned by Lindsay Kreps and Kyle McDaniel. Pictured (L to R) are Chamber Member Relations Manager Scott Wiley; Kreps' daughters, Katie Riddle, Emily Gray, Janet Kreps and Donna Jo Kreps; Kreps' husband, Fred Kreps, holding their grandson Dakota Gray; Kreps; McDaniel; McDaniel's fiance, Korby Sommers, and his parents, Sue Sommers and Joe Sommers; Chamber Ambassador Scott Clay and Chamber President and CEO Rob Parker. Photo by Leah Sander, InkFree News.
Legacy Family Health Care wants to bring "the (health care) relationship back to the provider and the patient.”

The Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce had a ribbon-cutting for the business on Saturday, which was also the date of its grand opening. It's located at 308 S. Scott St., Warsaw, and has been in operation since February, having not had a grand opening earlier related to COVID-19 and finishing work on the building.

Legacy functions differently than other health care offices, said its co-owner, Kyle McDaniel.

"Legacy Family Health Care is Warsaw's first direct primary care center," she said. "She (co-owner Lindsay Kreps) and I had previously worked at other practices together, and having worked in traditional medicine for 15-20 years, we know that there's a better way to do it."

McDaniel explained how direct primary care works.

"It takes the relationship back to the provider and the patient," she said. "Direct primary care is a grassroots movement nationwide. There's over 1,700 in the United States, there's 30 in Indiana, but we are the first for Warsaw, so we do not participate with third-party payers. We do not accept insurance."

Legacy also is not part of any hospital network.

"We are independent and therefore she (Kreps) has the autonomy to practice how she chooses and always putting the patient in the forefront of the need as opposed to checking off a list to meet insurance requirements," said McDaniel.

She also explained how payment works for Legacy's services.

"So services are available either a la carte, pay for a fee or for direct membership, so you can do membership and that membership has one flat fee, helps you control your costs because you know what to expect, yet you have unlimited access. You can come in as many times as needed," she said.

"And then we have medications and labs all on site and that is all done at full-sale cost," said McDaniel.

She gave a rundown of Legacy's services.

"Lindsay can address anything that any other family practice office can address, so that takes care of over 90% of your health care needs and manages chronic disease, addresses acute illness, (Kreps will) collaborate with specialists, in office procedures, female care, suturing, cyst removals, sports physicals, DOT physicals, the whole gambit," said McDaniel.

McDaniel explained Legacy can also do referrals if needed for additional care.

"The nice thing ... about being Legacy ... we can go anywhere we want, we don't have to stay within a certain hospital or network, which means we can find the best doctor suited to the best patient," she said.

Legacy's current hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. McDaniel said next year she and Kreps want "to expand to be open five days a week."

To set up appointments, people can stop by, call 574-575-4987 or go online to www.legacyfamilyhealthcare.org.

"We want to get this community healthy again and not afraid to go see a health care provider, to go see a doctor and there's so many that are underserved because they do not have insurance, can't afford insurance or their deductible is ridiculous, so we're trying to give them that option," said Kreps. "A lot of people say you know it's too good to be true since it's reduced cost, it's reduced quality. No, we're trying to change that."