Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday for the new assisted living dining room at Grace Village Retirement Community, Winona Lake. Pictured (L to R) are, front row: Chamber ambassador Heather Lardino, Chamber President and CEO Rob Parker, Bethel University at Grace College assistant professor of nursing Dale Robbins, Grace Village residents John and Marceil Conley, Culver Grown landscaper and architect Amy Haab, Chamber Member Relations Manager Scott Wiley, Chamber ambassador Scott Allison; back row: Chamber ambassadors Brittany Lyon and Glenn Hall, Grace Village Vice President and CFO Sondrea Hamilton, Kosciusko Community Hospital Director of Human Resources Chad Hummel and Grace Village CEO Justin Kimbrell. Photo by Jackie Gorski, Times-Union
Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday for the new assisted living dining room at Grace Village Retirement Community, Winona Lake. Pictured (L to R) are, front row: Chamber ambassador Heather Lardino, Chamber President and CEO Rob Parker, Bethel University at Grace College assistant professor of nursing Dale Robbins, Grace Village residents John and Marceil Conley, Culver Grown landscaper and architect Amy Haab, Chamber Member Relations Manager Scott Wiley, Chamber ambassador Scott Allison; back row: Chamber ambassadors Brittany Lyon and Glenn Hall, Grace Village Vice President and CFO Sondrea Hamilton, Kosciusko Community Hospital Director of Human Resources Chad Hummel and Grace Village CEO Justin Kimbrell. Photo by Jackie Gorski, Times-Union
WINONA LAKE – The new assisted living dining room at Grace Village Retirement Community was shown off during a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday by the Kosciusko Chamber of Commerce.

Justin Kimbrell, CEO of Grace Village Retirement Community, said the dining room was outdated, had old furniture and carpet.

Construction on the dining room started in September, which had to slow down due to the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, he said.

Due to COVID-19 regulations, there was a time when the retirement community didn’t use common areas, so it was a good time to work on projects like the dining room, Kimbrell said.

For the project, over $71,000 was raised, Kimbrell said. Individual donors made up a big part of the funding, which came mainly from the residential living residents.

A lot of the residents have supported the campus and “it’s amazing to have that,” Kimbrell said.

Changes made include taking out the popcorn ceiling and carpets and putting in new furniture, wood flooring and lighting, Kimbrell said.