Lutheran Health Kosciusko Community Hospital surgeons pictured (L to R) are Dr. Corey Graham, Dr. Luis Gonzalez, Dr. Patrick Ilada and Dr. Paul Haney. Photo provided
Lutheran Health Kosciusko Community Hospital surgeons pictured (L to R) are Dr. Corey Graham, Dr. Luis Gonzalez, Dr. Patrick Ilada and Dr. Paul Haney. Photo provided
The latest in surgical technology, robotic-assisted surgery, is now available locally at Kosciusko Community Hospital to aid surgeons when performing minimally invasive procedures.

For a “hands-on” experience, KCH is inviting community members to see the robot and simulate a robotic-assisted surgery using a demonstration model from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Oct. 17 in the front lobby of the hospital. Members of the robotic surgery team will be on hand to discuss the new technology and answer questions.

With robotic-assisted surgery, the procedures are performed entirely by the surgeon who controls the robotic system that provides high-definition 3D vision, a magnified view, and robotic and computer assistance. The surgeons use specialized instrumentation, including a miniaturized surgical camera and wristed instruments – scissors, scalpels and forceps – that are designed to help with precise dissection and reconstruction deep within the body.

Members of the KCH medical staff on the robotic surgery team include Dr. Patrick Ilada, Dr. Paul Haney, Dr. Corey Graham and Dr. Luis Gonzalez. Each is fully trained in robotic-assisted surgery and recognizes the benefits of the new technology for their patients.

KCH implemented the new robotic system Sept. 3.

“This investment in robotic-assisted technology helps us enhance the safety of our patients and the care they receive,” Gonzalez, an OB/GYN, said. “The surgeries I perform on women are very delicate. The robotic instrument’s range of motion, which exceeds those of the human hand, combined with 3D magnification allows me to see the anatomy in great detail.”

Gonzales said that because many of the surgeries he performs are lengthy, the new technology can also help minimize a surgeon’s fatigue that can occur while standing or hunched for long periods of time. Robotic technology enhances performance during long cases.

Ilada, a general surgeon at KCH, noted that length of stay after colonic surgery often is decreased by 24 to 48 hours from standard colonic surgery.

“My patients have significantly smaller incisions with robotic-assisted surgery,” Ilada said. “This can equate to less number of incisions, less pain and an overall better experience since the smaller entry point decreases infection potential, minimizes scarring and allows for efficient healing of the opening. It is an investment in clinical outcomes and my patients’ care.”