Editor, Times-Union:
What has become known as the Benghazi incident, and tragic death of four Americans, stands alongside other situations in which a president of the United States, and/or his administration, is more intent on saving face than doing what is right.
Do you remember “Watergate”? How about the “Iran-Contra” affair, or perhaps Monica in the Oval Office? Richard Nixon resigned the presidency in the face of certain conviction before the Senate. We forget Bill Clinton, already disbarred along with his wife, Hillary, was impeached by the house, but escaped conviction by a partisan Senate.
If she were here, my grandmother would say these fellows all “got too big for their britches.” The humor is lost in the simple tragedy of it all. These kinds of incidents are becoming all to frequent, and are symptomatic of a deeper, festering, blight on the United States. It seems all of our elected officials have become “too big for their britches,” too infatuated with their own importance, apparently much too important to recognize their constituents’ needs. How can it be that the people who hired these folks will be ignored?
Frankly, I have grown tired of the “spin.” I’m weary of those who would accept our appointment to high office, and subsequently forget we exist as they partake of the attention lavished upon them by lobbyists and bureaucrats in the Beltway, or at home in the smallest of communities.
It is becoming increasingly clear to me, the Benghazi tragedy is not just a partisan witch hunt by the right. It is also clear, the left has made every attempt to protect their standard bearer. The president of the United States, under the Constitution, holds the awesome responsibility to be the guiding hand, the CEO, over every department and agency in our growing federal bureaucracy. Therefore, it follows the “buck stops here” with the president. There is no escaping that fact. In business, we delegate and confirm. Why ignore the latter in governing?
In my view, it is also increasingly clear the president and his minions are more interested in their collective goals to “fundamentally transform America” in their own vision, rather than governing Constitutionally. The result is a timid foreign policy, increased regulation over businesses, loss of liberties for the masses, and an explosive federal deficit that may soon cripple the union.
Certainly, Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, red, blue, green, whatever political stripe, must recognize we cannot continue on a path of pure partisanship and continue to succeed as a Representative Republic. We are divided into hundreds of special interest groups, all lobbying for a particular point of view.
I’m reminded of another old expression, “The squeaking wheel gets the oil.”
Dan Lee
Warsaw, via email